I made a thing: Memeseeks! (Rick & Morty memes and gifs)

Just in time for the new season of Rick & Morty (as well as our own episode on the matter), we just released this thing we’ve been working on:

The Memeseeks Box

Meeseeks Christopher and Colbert

The Memeseeks Box

It’s a Rick & Morty memer and giffer (pronounced like the peanut butter ?). We’ve been saying at Decipher Scifi that we were working on a few things behind the scenes, and this was one of them. I’m glad to finally have it out there. 🙂

So meme away, and I hope you like it, and make sure you’re subscribed to the podcast for our Rick & Morty episode in a few days!

<edit from the future> here is our Rick and Morty episode!</future>

I may post some codey things about it here in the future.

Setting up Let’s Encrypt SSL on Bitnami WordPress (Multisite & Standard)

There are countless different ways to set up Apache and WordPress and SSL, but here is one way set up Let’s Encrypt certs on a Bitnami WordPress using the WP Encrypt plugin install if you have SSH access to the server and know how to use it. I don’t think I’ll continue to use the Bitnami stack but here is a thing I did while I was.

Back things up etc before you go changing things. Even better, do this on a test thing first. Things.


Bitnami provides a “stack” of apache and wordpress that makes it fairly easy to get a site going. There are pros and cons to using their stack. One pro is that they have easy installers on AWS Marketplace, so that may be how many people wind up using it. In any case, once you are using Bitnami WordPress, you may want to use Let’s Encrypt certs in a way that requires the least tinkering.

Let’s Encrypt

A full write-up is deep and way beyond the scope of this post, but Let’s Encrypt provides free easy SSL certs so the internet can be a more secure place. For more, see: About Let’s Encrypt.

WP Encrypt

Assuming your WordPress is configured correctly using your own domain(s), install the WP Encrypt plugin. Then use it to install Let’s Encrypt cert(s)

wp encrypt setup screen

Fill in the fields, check Auto-generate to make it magic, then Register then Generate. You will be presented with the paths to all of the certificates. If you’re using Multisite WordPress, the separate domains will all be registered as Subject Alternative Names for the main domain. If this doesn’t work for you, use CertBot or something instead. ¯_(ツ)_/¯

On the server

The way Bitnami configures its stack, apache is not in the normal location and is not configured the normal way. This is a pain, but it’s easy to design around.

Get into the file /opt/bitnami/apache2/conf/bitnami/bitnami.conf and add the SSLCACertificateFile line after the other SSL options:

Then link the apache certs, including the chain you added.

Then restart Apache via Bitnami


Backup and restore Pretty Links manually on WordPress (without Pro)

I needed to move my Pretty Link data from one install to another, and plugin settings do not come along for a normal WordPress export so it needed to be done explicitly. Pretty Link Pro (a worthy purchase if you do much pretty-linking) is needed to do it via GUI the easy way, and I only have the pedestrian Free version.

So let’s see what we can do the hard way. You’ll need ssh access to the server and the wordpress database name, user, and password (findable in your wp-config.php).


For a single-blog normal WordPress install Pretty Link data is stored in the following tables:

Else on a multisite WordPress install it’ll be more like this, with whatever numbers correspond to the blog on the network that you’re dealing with.

And after taking a look at the data within, it’s really what you’d expect: a list of urls to translate into other urls. Easy peasy, let’s export the explicit list of prli table names (changing as appropriate for multisite)

Now is the time to open up Vim and change some things if necessary. If doing migration between single wordpress installs, the tables names can stay the same. If you’re moving to another install of the same domain name, those can remain too. If going from normal to multisite, or from differently-numbered multisite blogs, you’ll need to edit the table names. If changing domains you’ll probably want to replace occurrences of the old domain name in all of the urls, or whatever. Up to you.

Then you can import.


Step one: back up your DB, dummy.

Step two: do something like this:

That’s all. Now you have your pretty links back. 😎